Department of Literature and Philosophy

A strong Department of Literature and Philosophy is central to a liberal arts education because it helps students to become incisive in their critical thinking, effective as communicators, aware of cultural diversity, and skillful as interpreters of the written and spoken word in all areas of life. We are committed to academic excellence, innovative instruction, and collaborative service to the community.

The disciplines of literature and philosophy - the traditional core of the humanities - ask the big questions: What does it mean to be human? How do we make meaning in this world? What is the relationship of individuals to society? Today these questions are complicated by topics such as class, race, ethnicity, and gender - all of which are addressed by classes in the Department. From Shakespeare to Postcolonial Studies to Existentialism to Epistemology, the Department of Literature and Philosophy has something for everyone.

Studying literature or philosophy provides excellent preparation for professional employment in any area where the close examination of written texts and the ability to communicate well are important. The Department takes pride in working with students to connect their immediate studies with their long-term goals.

A student graduating with a B.A. degree in English will be able to demonstrate the following:

  1. Produce prose that meets the standards of academic writing.
  2. Create an organized, well-developed, and effectively argued paper.
  3. Recognize, analyze, and evaluate literary techniques.
  4. Apply and incorporate/integrate literary criticism and theory appropriately.
  5. Situate and interpret a text(s) in its historical, cultural, or literary context.
  6. Create and deliver an effectively oral presentation directed to an audience conversant with the discipline.

A student graduating with a B.A. degree in Philosophy will be able to demonstrate the following:

  1. Present and explain the thought of a philosopher or philosophical theory accurately and clearly, demonstrating a strong background in discipline-specific knowledge, including the history and major periods of Philosophy, major thinkers, and major fields of study and theories of Philosophy.
  2. Critically evaluate philosophical positions, identifying central arguments and their support, demonstrating an ability to think through complex issues with clarity.
  3. Present an independent evaluation of or response to the material.  Support one's own philosophical positions with well-reasoned argumentation, providing a thesis that is properly stated, focused, and clear, and defending this thesis in a way that is well-organized and well-supported.

A student graduating with a B.A. degree in Philosophy with a Religious Studies Concentration will be able to demonstrate the following:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of beliefs, practices, and institutions that have been classified as religious.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of key concepts and major theorists in the study of religion.
  3. Analyze religious data by critically assessing relevant primary and secondary texts.
  4. Utilize theories and methods from different disciplinary approaches to the study of religion.
  5. Synthesize relevant data to support an argument that explains some aspect of religion.

Literature and Philosophy Concentration

COML   2531   Crossing Borders

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This is the foundation course for the Minor in Comparative Literature. It is designed as a transcultural, interdisciplinary course in which students discover and analyze English and other national literatures in translation. Course includes guest lecturers from a number of related disciplines.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

COML   3090   Selected Topics

1-3 Credit Hours.   1-3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected topics in comparative literature.

COML   3530   Literary Translation

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Introduction to the history and theory of literary translation. Emphasis on practical problems and techniques, with exercises culminating in the translation of a foreign language text appropriate to the student's interests and abilities.

COML   5330   World Drama to Romanticism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of representative works of dramatic literature, primarily of the western world, from Aeschylus through Beaumarchais, excluding English drama.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5330, ENGL   5330G, COML   5330G.

COML   5530   The Bible as Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the literary dimension of the English Bible. Major emphasis is upon the literary themes, types, personalities, and incidents of the Old and New Testaments.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2111 and ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): COML   5530G, ENGL   5530, ENGL   5530G, RELS   5530, RELS   5530G.

COML   5533   Literary Criticism and Theory

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An historical survey of literary criticism and theory from antiquity to modern times. Literary criticism considers issues important for all students of literature, such as the value of poetry in our world, the power of poets to represent reality or truth, and the sources of poetic inspiration. This course also delves into the subject of aesthetics, the nature of beauty, and the variety of forces that impact how humans respond to literature.

Prerequisite(s): COML   2531.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5533.

COML   5536   Post-Colonial Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Examines and evaluates the diverse "common-wealth" of post- colonial Anglophone literature written by authors from countries that were formerly part of the British Empire: Africa, Australia, Canada, the Indian sub-continent, Ireland, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, and the West Indies. Highlights the use of a variety of reading and critical strategies to analyze the formal and linguistic complexities and innovations of this literature.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2131 and ENGL   2232.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5536, ENGL   5536G, COML   5536G.

ENGL   2111   World Literature I

0,3 Credit Hours.   0,3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of great works of world literature from ancient times to the end of the seventeenth century. Beginning with the oral tradition, the course studies classical works and their impact on later literature, the spread of ideas beyond national and ethnic boundaries, and the influence of philosophy and religion on literature. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2111H, ENGL   2111S.

ENGL   2111H   World Literature I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of great works of world literature from ancient times to the end of the seventeenth century. Beginning with the oral tradition, the course studies classical works and their impact on later literature, the spread of ideas beyond national and ethnic boundaries, and the influence of philosophy and religion on literature. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2111, ENGL   2111S.

ENGL   2111S   World Literature I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of great works of world literature from ancient times to the end of the seventeenth century. Beginning with the oral tradition, the course studies classical works and their impact on later literature, the spread of ideas beyond national and ethnic boundaries, and the influence of philosophy and religion on literature. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2111, ENGL   2111H.

ENGL   2112   World Literature II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of great works of literature from the 1700's to the present. The course studies literary representation and reaction to the rise of science, industrialism, internationalism, and other forces shaping the modern and postmodern world. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2112H, ENGL   2112S.

ENGL   2112H   World Literature II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of great works of literature from the 1700's to the present. The course studies literary representation and reaction to the rise of science, industrialism, internationalism, and other forces shaping the modern and postmodern world. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2112, ENGL   2112S.

ENGL   2112S   World Literature II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of great works of literature from the 1700's to the present. The course studies literary representation and reaction to the rise of science, industrialism, internationalism, and other forces shaping the modern and postmodern world. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2112, ENGL   2112H.

ENGL   2131   Introduction to Literary Studies

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An examination of the fundamental principles of literary study, with special attention to critical approaches to language and literature, bibliography and research, and writing in the discipline. Required of all majors.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

ENGL   2231   British Literature I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of British literature and literary history from the Old English Period through the pre-Romantics, Focusing on literary types, themes, and historical, political, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2231S.

ENGL   2231S   British Literature I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of British literature and literary history from the Old English Period through the pre-Romantics, Focusing on literary types, themes, and historical, political, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2231.

ENGL   2232   British Literature II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the major British literature from the Romantic Period (1780) to the present, focusing on major movements, authors, and themes.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2232H, ENGL   2232S.

ENGL   2232H   British Literature II Honors

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the major British literature from the Romantic Period (1780) to the present, focusing on major movements, authors, and themes.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2232, ENGL   2232S.

ENGL   2232S   British Literature II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the major British literature from the Romantic Period (1780) to the present, focusing on major movements, authors, and themes.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL 2232, ENGL   2232H.

ENGL   2331   American Literature I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of American Literature from the period of exploration and colonization through the Enlightenment and American Romanticism, concluding with the end of the Civil War.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102 .

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2331S.

ENGL   2331S   American Literature I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of American Literature from the period of exploration and colonization through the Enlightenment and American Romanticism, concluding with the end of the Civil War.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   2331.

ENGL   2332   American Literature II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of American literature from 1865 to the present, focusing on major movements, authors, and themes.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   1102.

ENGL   2434   The Language of Film

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the semantics of cinema and the evolution of the film language. The course will examine technical, literary, and cultural means and aspects of communicating meaning in film.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL   1102.

ENGL   3231   Survey of African-American Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of African-American literature from its beginnings to the present, focusing on important movements, genres, and themes.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2332 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

ENGL   3232   The Art of Film Adaptation of Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Comparative interpretation of the differences between literature and film and the complex challenges of turning diverse narrative literature into autonomous works of cinema.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

ENGL   3237   Women and Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the literature by and about women, which reflects some of the myths, legends, and social forces molding the female character.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

ENGL   3535   Patterns in Film and Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A comparative interpretation of themes, ideas, and patterns in selected works of narrative literature, and cinema.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

ENGL   4133   The British Novel

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the development of the novel in English through the reading of a selective list of novels which best illustrate the main tendencies in the English fiction of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4133S.

ENGL   4133S   The British Novel

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the development of the novel in English through the reading of a selective list of novels which best illustrate the main tendencies in the English fiction of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4133.

ENGL   4135   Chaucer

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of The Canterbury Tales and other selected works. May be used to fulfill the single author requirement.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4135S.

ENGL   4135S   Chaucer

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of The Canterbury Tales and other selected works. May be used to fulfill the single author requirement.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4135.

ENGL   4237   The American Novel

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of the development of the novel in America, eighteenth through twentieth centuries, with special study of a list of works selected to illustrate the major movements in American fiction.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 or ENGL   2332 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

ENGL   4337   Shakespeare

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A close reading of Shakespeare's major comedies, histories, selected romances, dramatic tragedies, and the sonnets offering students an overview of a major Western Literary Icon. Fulfills single author requirement.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4337S.

ENGL   4337S   Shakespeare

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A close reading of Shakespeare's major comedies, histories, selected romances, dramatic tragedies, and the sonnets offering students an overview of a major Western Literary Icon. Fulfills single author requirement.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4337.

ENGL   4435   Single Author

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Devoted to the study of a single author whose work has occasioned a significant body of criticism. Students will focus on the body of the author's work and consider both historical context and critical response.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4435S.

ENGL   4435S   Single Author

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Devoted to the study of a single author whose work has occasioned a significant body of criticism. Students will focus on the body of the author's work and consider both historical context and critical response.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   4435.

ENGL   4630   Senior Seminar

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

In the senior seminar, English majors will study a discrete body of literature and conduct extensive research in literary criticism related to a specific topic. Emphasis will be on the individual preparation of research papers. Seminar topics will vary with professor.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2131 and ENGL   2132.

ENGL   5090   Selected Topics

1-3 Credit Hours.   1-3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected topics in English.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5090G and ENGL   5090S.

ENGL   5090S   Selected Topics

1-3 Credit Hours.   1-3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected topics in English.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5090, ENGL   5090G.

ENGL   5131   British Romantics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of English Romantic poetry and prose, including major works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, Keats, and many recently rediscovered authors of the period.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5131G, ENGL   5131S.

ENGL   5131S   British Romantics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of English Romantic poetry and prose, including major works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, Keats, and many recently rediscovered authors of the period.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or 2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5131, ENGL   5131G.

ENGL   5134   The Age of Exuberance: British Literature 1660-1790

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of verse and prose from the Restoration to the Romantic period.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5134G.

ENGL   5135   Teaching Literature to Middle and Secondary School Students

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A course designed to introduce classroom approaches to literature to middle grades and high school teachers. It will include work with a variety of literary genres and multicultural texts.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2112 and ENGL   2131 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5135G.

ENGL   5136   Medieval British Literature: 700-1450

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course explores the rich and varied literature of medieval Britain, the region of Europe with the earliest vernacular literary tradition. From the Old English period, students will read heroic and elegiac poetry, as well as the religious poetry and prose written after the Christian conversion of the pagan Germanic tribes. From the Middle English period after the Norman Conquest, students will read some of the earliest dramatic works in English, the powerful writings of female religious mystics, as well as a sampling of romances concerning King Arthur. All works will be read in modernized English.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5136S and ENGL   5136G.

ENGL   5136S   Medieval British Literature: 700-1450

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course explores the rich and varied literature of medieval Britain, the region of Europe with the earliest vernacular literary tradition. From the Old English period, students will read heroic and elegiac poetry, as well as the religious poetry and prose written after the Christian conversion of the pagan Germanic tribes. From the Middle English period after the Norman Conquest, students will read some of the earliest dramatic works in English, the powerful writings of female religious mystics, as well as a sampling of romances concerning King Arthur. All works will be read in modernized English.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5136 and ENGL   5136G.

ENGL   5138   Poetry and Prose of the English Renaissance

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study centering on the analysis and interpretation of Renaissance poetry with some involvement in its larger historical context, especially in its relationship with controversy.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5138G.

ENGL   5139   Victorian Prose and Poetry

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the Victorian Period in England with emphasis on the prose and poetry of major authors.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5139G.

ENGL   5230   Colonial American Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A detailed study of the poetry and prose from 1492-1800 by writers, both in America and Europe, who describe and define a distinct American identity by means of an emerging literature and diverse cultural experience.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2331 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5230G.

ENGL   5231   American Romanticism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of representative authors of the Romantic Period in American literature (1820-1865). This course focuses on the complex social, cultural, and political forces at work in these writings and in the Romantic Movement in general, and especially the influences of the earlier Romantic Period in English literature (1798-1832). This course traces the development of the major literary styles and patterns in American Romanticism, such as the archetype of the American Adam and the myth of the American Dream; the importance of American innovation in literary language and form, especially in the use of frontier dialect; and the contributions to world literature of American literary theorists, such as Poe.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2331 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5231G.

ENGL   5233   American Realism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of prose works of the American Realist period from 1850-1910, including writers such as Twain, Jewett, Chesnutt, Gilman, Dreiser, Wharton, James, Crane, and Norris. Attention will be paid to canonical and non-canonical writers of the period, as well as regional and sentimental fiction.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2332 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5233G.

ENGL   5234   Southern Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of the literary achievements of the South from the Colonial period to the present.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2331 or ENGL   2332 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5234G.

ENGL   5235   Irish Literature to 1850

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The course examines Irish literature from its beginnings in the Gaelic oral tradition to the Great Famine of the 1840s. Students gain clear understanding of how Ireland's colorful and complex history has yielded exceptional prose, poetry, and drama. Matters considered include Ireland's four mythological cycles; its pseudo-historical invasion narratives; and its hagiographies (accounts of saints' lives). Students also study writings that reflect the four major stages of British colonization: Cambro-Norse, Tudor, Jacobean (or Scots-Irish), and Cromwellian. In addition, they explore literary genres specific to Ireland: dinnseanchas (place-lore literature); the aisling (nationalist vision literature); the caoineadh (bardic lament literature); and the Big House novel, which often has Gothic overtones. The course exposes participants to other important phenomena, too: the so-called stage Irishman; the peasant archetype; literature of resistance and revolution; and travel writings in the sublime tradition. All texts studied are in English or English translation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2331 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5235G.

ENGL   5236   Irish Literature since 1850

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Irish Literature since1850 examines novels, short stories, plays, and poems produced in Ireland since the country's Great Famine. The course explores the Irish Cultural Revival that began in 1884 and lasted until the 1920s. It also considers literature about the revolutionary activity that precipitated the founding of the Irish Free State and Northern Ireland. The course ends by studying literary works that reflect changes in culture and identity caused by Ireland's unprecedented economic boom, which began in the mid-1990s. Students gain knowledge about a range of authors, including James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Lady Augusta Gregory, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney, Evan Boland, and others.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5236G, ENGL 5236H.

ENGL   5238   Irish Women Writers

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Irish Women Writers examines literature produced by Irish and Irish diasporic women across the centuries. It explores mythic and other female archetypes that affect and are represented in Irish women's writing. It also scrutinizes the different types of Irish women's writing, including novels, short stories, poetry, and drama, as well as testificatory, epistolary, controversialist and other specialized genres. The course assesses Irish women’s writing in relation to key historical, cultural, political, and socio-economic circumstances that inform it and upon which it comments.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 or ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5238G.

ENGL   5330   World Drama to Romanticism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of representative works of dramatic literature, primarily of the western world, from Aeschylus through Beaumarchais, excluding English drama.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5530G, COML   5330, COML   5330G.

ENGL   5331   British Drama to 1642

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of British drama from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance, focusing on historical and cultural contexts of the drama. Students will learn about medieval guilds and the mystery plays they produced, morality plays such as Everyman, and interludes and other dramas performed in courtly settings. Much of the course will focus on the vibrant professional theater that developed in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century London. Students will learn about some of Shakespeare's talented contemporaries, not only Marlowe and Jonson but also Webster, Middleton, Ford, and other playwrights whose vigorous and sometimes shocking plays offer a fascinating look at early modern English theater and life.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5331G.

ENGL   5332   British Drama since 1660

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of British drama from the reopening of the theatres in 1660 to modern times. Students will study important plays from the English Restoration and Neo-Classical period (e.g., Congreve, Dryden, Goldsmith, Sheridan), the Romantic period (e.g., Shelley), the Victorian period (e.g., Wilde, Synge, Shaw), as well as plays from the 20th Century (e.g., Pinter, Becket, Stoppard). Plays will be studied in their historical and critical contexts.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5332G.

ENGL   5430   Contemporary Poetry

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of English language poetry written since World War II with an emphasis on major figures and literary movements. Significant attention will be paid to the diversity and multinational character of contemporary English language verse.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5430G.

ENGL   5432   Twentieth Century British Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of major British and Commonwealth poets, novelists, and dramatists against the background of the major social and cultural changes of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5432G, ENGL   5432S.

ENGL   5434   Milton

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of one of the greatest and most exciting of all English poets, based on close study of his work and exploration of the religious and historical circumstances of its time. We will read all of "Paradise Lost", a wide selection of Milton's other poetry, and some of the most important of his prose works. May be used to fulfil the single author requirement.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2231 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5434G.

ENGL   5432S   20th C British Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of major British and Commonwealth poets, novelists, and dramatists against the background of the major social and cultural changes of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5432, ENGL   5432G.

ENGL   5438   Modern Poetry to 1945

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of British, Irish, and American poets and poetry since 1900, emphasis being placed on the more influential, such as Yeats, Pound, Frost, Eliot, and Stevens.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5438G.

ENGL   5530   The Bible as Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the literary dimension of the English Bible. Major emphasis is upon the literary themes, types, personalities, and incidents of the Old and New Testaments.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): COML   5530, COML   5530G, ENGL   5530G, RELS   5530, RELS   5530G.

ENGL   5533   Literary Criticism and Theory

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An historical survey of literary criticism and theory from antiquity to modern times. Literary criticism considers issues important for all students of literature, such as the value of poetry in our world, the power of poets to represent reality or truth, and the sources of poetic inspiration. This course also delves into the subject of aesthetics, the nature of beauty, and the variety of forces that impact how humans respond to literature.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in ENGL   2132.

Cross Listing(s): COML   5533.

ENGL   5534   Literature for Adolescents

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of literature, primarily (but not exclusively) narrative, on the subject of adolescence, with emphasis on analyzing and evaluating contemporary literature written especially for or about adolescents.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5534G.

ENGL   5535   Children's Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of literature written for or read by children with a focus on British and American classics. Students will read and write critical analyses of these works with special attention to the history of childhood. Authors studied may include the Brothers Grimm, Lewis Carroll, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Kenneth Grahame, Frances Hodgson Burnett, and others.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5535G.

ENGL   5536   Post-Colonial Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Examines and evaluates the diverse “common-wealth” of post-colonial Anglophone literature written by authors from countries that were formerly part of the British Empire: Africa, Australia, Canada, the Indian sub-continent, Ireland, New Zealand, Southeast Asia, and the West Indies. Highlights the use of a variety of reading and critical strategies to analyze the formal and linguistic complexities and innovations of this literature.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2232 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): COML   5536, COML   5536G, ENGL   5536G.

ENGL   5538   World Fiction since 1900

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of some of the major works of fiction written by American, British, and World authors since 1900.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5538G.

ENGL   5539   Literature by Women

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of classic, contemporary, and experimental writing by women in all genres, with special emphasis on the polemical and theoretical bases of and critical approaches to such texts.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 or ENGL   2112 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): ENGL   5539G.

HUMN   2321   Humanities I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A historically-organized interdisciplinary approach to the fine and performing arts from antiquity to ca. 1600. Team taught large group lectures and small group discussions. Students are expected to enroll in both HUMN   2321 and HUMN   2322 to fulfill Area C requirement of the Core.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   1101 or WRIT   1101.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2321S.

HUMN   2321S   Humanities I

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A historically-organized interdisciplinary approach to the fine and performing arts from antiquity to ca. 1600. Team taught large group lectures and small group discussions. Students are expected to enroll in both HUMN   2321 and HUMN   2322 to fulfill Area C requirement of the Core.

Prerequisite(s):A minimum grade of "C" an prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   1101 or WRIT   1101.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2321.

HUMN   2322   Humanities II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A historically-organized interdisciplinary approach to the fine and performing arts from ca. 1600 to the present. Team taught large group lectures and small group discussions. Students are expected to enroll in both HUMN   2321 and HUMN   2322 to fulfill Area C requirement of the Core.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   1101 or WRIT   1101.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2322S.

HUMN   2322S   Humanities II

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A historically-organized interdisciplinary approach to the fine and performing arts from ca. 1600 to the present. Team taught large group lectures and small group discussions. Students are expected to enroll in both HUMN   2321 and HUMN   2322 to fulfill Area C requirement of the Core.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   1101 or WRIT   1101.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2322.

HUMN   2433   Classicism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Explores classicism as both a philosophical approach and an aesthetic style in art, rhetoric, literature, architecture, and music.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2433S.

HUMN   2433S   Classicism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Explores classicism as both a philosophical approach and an aesthetic style in art, rhetoric, literature, architecture, and music.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2433.

HUMN   2434   Myth in Arts and Humanities

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Explores selected myths and their treatments in art, rhetoric, literature, theater, and music.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2434S.

HUMN   2434S   Myth in Arts and Humanities

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Explores selected myths and their treatments in art, rhetoric, literature, theater, and music.

Cross Listing(s): HUMN   2434.

HUMN   3431   Digital Humanities

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course provides a hands-on overview of the rapidly-expanding world of digital applications of the humanities. Ranging from visualizing data in maps and diagrams to interactive experiences like games, the digital humanist is not only a researcher but also a designer who helps make things public and the humanities social. This class not only introduces principles and theoretical approaches, but also offers opportunities to learn techniques and begin to build a portfolio of work for the Digital Humanities Minor.

HUMN   3731   Digital Humanities Internship

3 Credit Hours.   0 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The Digital Humanities Internship is intended to offer the student a chance to individually or with a larger group create a portfolio-quality digital humanities project for an organization outside of the university, building skills for a career involving the digital humanities. In tandem with a faculty mentor, students will plan a project and then over the course of a semester develop content and a platform for its digital delivery in relation to the needs of the organization with which they are working. This class may be taught as a tutorial with a single professor as mentor or as a seminar with other students.

HUMN   4631   Capstone Project for Digital Humanities

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The capstone class is the final class in the Digital Humanities Minor and is intended to offer the student a chance to individually or with a larger group create a portfolio-quality digital humanities project. Students will plan a final project, research content and develop a platform for its digital delivery. At the end of the process, the project will go 'live' for both an academic audience and a larger public. This class may be taught as a tutorial with a single professor as mentor or as a seminar with other students.

PHIL   2010   Introduction to Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This is an introductory course which surveys the ideas of some of the great philosophers of the Western world, focusing on issues about religion, ethics, reality, and ways of knowing.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   2010H, PHIL   2010S.

PHIL   2010H   Introduction to Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This is an introductory course which surveys the ideas of some of the great philosophers of the Western world, focusing on issues about religion, ethics, reality, and ways of knowing.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   2010, PHIL   2010S.

PHIL   2010S   Introduction to Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This is an introductory course which surveys the ideas of some of the great philosophers of the Western world, focusing on issues about religion, ethics, reality, and ways of knowing.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   2010, PHIL   2010H.

PHIL   2020   Critical Thinking

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is an introduction to the concepts and skills necessary for identifying, evaluating, and constructing good arguments. Topics will include strategies that are used to strengthen or weaken an argument, spot fallacious ways of reasoning, and identify hidden assumptions. The course also studies the basic elements of deductive reasoning.

PHIL   2030   Introduction to Ethics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is an introduction to the main concepts of philosophical ethics such as virtue, duty, utility, rights, and liberty. The course also introduces philosophers whose ethical theories have been historically the most influential, such as Aristotle, Kant, and Mill.

PHIL   2131   Classical Political Thought

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

PHIL   3030   Selected Topics in Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected Topics.

PHIL   3030S   Selected Topics in Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected Topics.

PHIL   3131   World Religions

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The teachings concerning people and their relations to God and the world found in the major world religions. Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Confucianism, Jainism, and Buddhism are among the religions studied.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   3131.

PHIL   3230   Modern Political Thought

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The course in modern political thought is concerned with the differentiation of politics as an activity distinct from, and independent of, religion. Political thinkers in the modern period are distinguished by their turn to scientific and other modern modes of rationality as foundations for the analysis of politics. Central concerns include delineating the rights and powers of the individual and establishing a secular basis for a just society.

Cross Listing(s): POLS   3230.

PHIL   3232   Philosophy of Law

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of major topics in the philosophy of law, all of which concern the relationship of law to morality and justice-including the nature of law in general; the importance of the rule of law and of limiting the rule of law; and some theory and practice of criminal law.

Cross Listing(s): POLS   3232.

PHIL   3330   Philosophy of Art

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A critical study of philosophical theories about the nature of art drawing from both traditional and contemporary thinkers. Topics include defining and evaluating art, describing the creative process, the significance of art in society, censorship, the connection between art and politics, and the relationship between art and commercialism.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3330H, PHIL   3330S.

PHIL   3330H   Intro to Art & Beauty Honors

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A critical study of the philosophical theories about the nature of art and beauty drawing from both traditional and contemporary thinkers. Topics include defining art and beauty justifying aesthetic judgments, analyzing artistic creation, and determining the value of art.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3330, PHIL   3330S.

PHIL   3330S   Introduction to Art & Beauty

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A critical study of the philosophical theories about the nature of art and beauty drawing from both traditional and contemporary thinkers. Topics include defining art and beauty justifying aesthetic judgments, analyzing artistic creation, and determining the value of art.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3330, PHIL   3330H.

PHIL   3332   Contemporary Moral Problems

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A course in applied ethics which provides a philosophic discussion of the most salient ethical problems of the day. Typically the course will cover such topics as abortion, animal rights, euthanasia, capital punishment, and suicide.

PHIL   3334   Environmental Ethics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the moral relations between human beings and their natural environment. The course examines theories of valuing nature, applies ethical analysis to environmental problems, and explores the underlying causes of environmental degradation.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1030 or PHIL   2010.

PHIL   3431   Ancient Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The main ideas of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, Plotinus, and St. Augustine and a consideration of how those ideas apply to our lives.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3431S.

PHIL   3431S   Ancient Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The main ideas of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, Plotinus, and St. Augustine and a consideration of how those ideas apply to our lives.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3431.

PHIL   3432   Modern Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The main ideas held by philosophers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, tracing many of the positions that lead us to think as we do today. Thinkers included are Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton.

PHIL   3433   Nineteenth Century European Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of the Continental philosophers of the nineteenth century and their ideas regarding the nature of knowledge, truth, reality, God, religion, society, and humanity. Philosophers studied include Hegel, Marx, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3433S.

PHIL   3433S   Nineteenth Century European Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of the Continental philosophers of the nineteenth century and their ideas regarding the nature of knowledge, truth, reality, God, religion, society, and humanity. Philosophers studied include Hegel, Marx, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3433.

PHIL   3434   Contemporary Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey of the main philosophical movements of the twentieth century, primarily in the English-speaking world. The course will stress the importance of language in thinking about some of the traditional problems of philosophy, such as what can be known and what exists. Readings will include selections from Russell, Wittgenstein, Moore, and others.

PHIL   3531   Theory of Knowledge

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the main theories concerning the nature of knowledge and belief. Topics will include problems of scepticism, the reliability of perception and memory, and the sources of justification.

PHIL   3532   Metaphysics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the main theories concerning the nature of reality. Topics will include what things exist, the nature of space, time, matter, self, freedom, infinity, and God.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3532S.

PHIL   3532S   Metaphysics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the main theories concerning the nature of reality. Topics will include what things exist, the nature of space, time, matter, self, freedom, infinity, and God.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3532.

PHIL   3635   Existentialism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the existentialist movement in philosophy from its origins to the present, showing how and why the movement began, what its authors advocate, and how it has been assessed by contemporary critics. Readings will include selections from Kierkegaard, Jaspers, Heidegger, Sartre, and others.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   3635.

PHIL   4130   Feminist Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An introduction to the main topics in Feminist Philosophy to include the adversary method and the 'maleness' of philosophy; dualities of mind and body, male and female, self and other; women's ways of knowing; caring and maternal thinking; and ecofeminism. Feminist philosophy addresses these ideals and assumptions in the western philosophic traditions that have oppressed women and other subordinate groups.

Cross Listing(s): WGST   4130.

PHIL   4233   Introduction to Formal Logic

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Fundamentals of propositional and predicate logic. Emphasis will be placed on construction of proofs in formal systems.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   4233H.

PHIL   4233H   Introduction to Formal Logic (Honors)

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Fundamentals of propositional and predicate logic. Emphasis will be placed on construction of proofs in formal systems.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   4233.

PHIL   4433   The Irish Philosophical Tradition

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course focuses on the history of Irish Philosophy, from the Irish Augustine, a seventh-century monk, to contemporary philosophers working in Ireland today. Special emphasis is placed on the Irish contribution to Empiricism in the work of Robert Boyle, William Molyneux, and George Berkeley.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   4433S.

PHIL   4433S   Irish Philosophical Tradition

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course focuses on the history of Irish Philosophy, from the Irish Augustine, a seventh-century monk, to contemporary philosophers working in Ireland today. Special emphasis is placed on the Irish contribution to Empiricism in the work of Robert Boyle, William Molyneux, and George Berkeley.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   4433.

PHIL   4434   Focus on the Philosopher

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The work of a great philosopher warrants a more detailed study than a survey course can allow. This advanced course is a detailed, semester-long study of the work of an important philosopher. The philosophers covered may vary from semester to semester, and from instructor to instructor.

PHIL   4532   Philosophy of Emotions

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is designed to help students understand the nature of emotions, and to enable students to become better equipped to understand their own emotions. Students will study and critically evaluate the major contemporary theories of emotion as well as historical accounts of emotion.

PHIL   4533   Philosophy of Mind

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An introduction to the most important questions in the philosophy of mind. The course will ask what minds are, whether statements about minds can be replaced by or reduced to statements about brains, what consciousness is, and whether there can be artificial intelligence.

PHIL   4534   Philosophy in Film

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course investigates philosophical issues that are raised in film, as well as the effectiveness of film as a philosophical medium. Films are analyzed for their philosophical content. This content is then investigated in further detail.

PHIL   4632   Philosophy of Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An in-depth examination of religious teachings and basic philosophical problems associated with them. Topics considered will include creation, salvation, life after death, the origin of evil, religious experience, and God.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   4632.

PHIL   5030   Selected Topics in Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected Topics in Philosophy.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   5030G, PHIL   5030S.

PHIL   5030S   Selected Topics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected Topics in Philosophy.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   5030, PHIL   5030G.

RELS   2130   Introduction to Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Introduction to definitions, perspectives, and methods used in religious studies, as well as, to the varieties of religious issues and expressions.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   2130H, RELS   2130S.

RELS   2130H   Introduction to Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Introduction to definitions, perspectives, and methods used in religious studies, as well as, to the varieties of religious issues and expressions.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   2130, RELS   2130S.

RELS   2130S   Introduction to Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Introduction to definitions, perspectives, and methods used in religious studies, as well as, to the varieties of religious issues and expressions.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   2130, RELS   2130H.

RELS   3030   Selected Topics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected Topics in Religious Studies.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   3030S.

RELS   3030S   Selected Topics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Selected Topics in Religious Studies.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   3030.

RELS   3131   World Religions

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The teachings concerning people and their relations to God and the world found in the major world religions. Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Confucianism, Jainism, and Buddhism are among the religions studied.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3131.

RELS   3134   Introduction to Asian Religions

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is an introduction to the religious traditions of Asia. Traditions covered include Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Islam, Daoism, and Confucianism.

RELS   3135   Introduction to Hinduism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is an in-depth exploration of the Hindu traditions, and the beliefs, rituals, and cultural expressions of those who practice them.

RELS   3136   Introduction to Global Islam

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is an in-depth exploration of Islam around the world, and the beliefs, rituals, and cultural expressions of those who practice it.

RELS   3137   Introduction to Christianity

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will introduce students to the academic study of diverse social, intellectual, and political movements that have been classified as Christian.

RELS   3138   Introduction to Buddhism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will introduce students to the academic study of diverse social, intellectual, and political movements that have been classified as Buddhist.

RELS   3139   History of Religion in the U.S.

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A survey and analysis of the major religious patterns in the United States with special attention given to belief systems, institutional forms, social composition, and historical development.

Cross Listing(s): HIST   3139.

RELS   3231   Psychology of Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An introduction to the literature of the psychology of religion, including the functions of religiousness, types of religious experiences, religious motivation, and the relationship between religion and mental health.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC   1101.

Cross Listing(s): PSYC   3231.

RELS   3233   The Early Church

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

How did Christianity turn from an illegal, persecuted cult into the official religion of the Roman empire" The course will focus on the first five hundred years of the Christian church: its development, doctrine, and especially its relationship with the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean world (Greece, Rome, and the Near East).

Cross Listing(s): HIST   3233.

RELS   3234   Asian Religious Philosophy

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of Asian religious philosophy based on reading and analysis of primary texts (in translation) from Hindu, Buddhist, and Daoist traditions. Through close investigation of philosophical texts, the course will explore ideas about ethics, truth, and the nature of reality.

RELS   3235   Religion, Sex, and Gender

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course explores the complex and varied construction of gender and sex in different religious texts, practices, and institutions. While an essential part of the course will take the form of lectures, a major component will consist of discussion and co-inquiry.

RELS   3237   Genesis and Human Relations

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will focus on a detailed and careful reading of the text of the book of Genesis, with two primary aims in mind: 1) an understanding of the narratives, within the historical context and more importantly the theological nexus of the narrative; and 2) the implications and applications for contemporary society and the issues we face.

RELS   3238   The Hebrew Prophets

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will introduce the student to the major themes of the Hebrew Prophets. We shall examine the various historical and cultural contexts of the prophets as much as this is possible, and explore the prophets’ message with a particular emphasis on textual analysis and implications for contemporary society.

RELS   3239   Human Suffering and the Bible

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will help students explore, interpret, and understand the many and varying contexts in which human suffering is presented in the Bible. The course treats questions such as the role God plays in human suffering, freedom of choice, the causes and effects of suffering, and the concept of "theodicy" -- how human beings strive to reconcile suffering and the notion of a loving, merciful God. Students will look at personal, communal, and national suffering in the Bible and in present-day society.

RELS   3250   The Muslim World to Tamerlane

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the rise of Islam in the seventh century and of the various Muslim societies that arose prior to the fifteenth century from the Iberian Peninsula to South Asia.

Cross Listing(s): HIST   3250, INTS   3250.

RELS   3251   The Muslim World Since Genghis Khan

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the global reach of Islam since the thirteenth century. The focus is on how Muslim societies have dealt with the precipitous decline in their well-being since their pinnacle of influence in the seventeenth century.

Cross Listing(s): HIST   3251, INTS   3251.

RELS   3330   Introduction to the Hebrew Bible

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental ideas, themes, and trajectories in the Hebrew Bible. We shall examine the various historical, cultural, and religious contexts of the Hebrew Bible as far as this is possible, and seek to broaden our understanding of the various claims of the text, and in turn to stimulate questions and reflections on contemporary relevance. Close attention will be paid to the reading and interpretation of the text.

RELS   3331   Great Moral Philosophers

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

RELS   3334   Christian Europe 450-1750

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

The major theme of this course is the development of various Christian traditions in Europe from the early middle ages to the Enlightenment. Topics include the spread of Christianity, formation of distinct Christian churches, and the many wars fought in the name of Christianity.

Cross Listing(s): HIST   3334.

RELS   3335   Introduction to the New Testament

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course introduces the fundamental ideas, themes, and trajectories represented in New Testament texts. We shall examine the historical, cultural, and religious contexts of the New Testament and broaden our understanding of the various claims of its texts. We shall also question and reflect upon the New Testament's contemporary relevance. Close attention will be paid to the texts.

RELS   3336   Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will focus on humanistic and transpersonal approaches to psychology, those "third" and "fourth" forces that offer a view of the person which goes beyond that offered by positivistic behavioral theory or by classical psychoanalytic theory.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC   1101.

Cross Listing(s): PSYC   3336, PSYC   3336H.

RELS   3430   Religion and Politics

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

This course will examine the production of religion and politics from a global perspective. Students will learn about political theories of religion as well as consider the intersection of religion and politics in different national and international contexts.

RELS   3635   Existentialism

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the existentialist movement in philosophy from its origins to the present, showing how and why the movement began, what its authors advocate, and how it has been assessed by contemporary critics. Readings will include selections from Kierkegaard, Jaspers, Heidegger, Sartre, and others.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   3635.

RELS   4336   Science and Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Examines the interactions between science and religion from ancient times to the present.

Cross Listing(s): HIST   4336.

RELS   4632   Philosophy of Religion

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

An in-depth examination of religious teachings and basic philosophical problems associated with them. Topics considered will include creation, salvation, life after death, the origin of evil, religious experience, and God.

Cross Listing(s): PHIL   4632.

RELS   4890   Seminar in Religious Studies

1-9 Credit Hours.   1-9 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Seminar in Religious Studies.

RELS   5332   The Reformation

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

Focuses on the breakup of western Christian unity in the sixteenth century, particularly on the formation of Lutheran and Calvinist denominations and the social, political, and economic consequences for all Europeans through the seventeenth century.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   5332G, HIST   5332, HIST   5332G.

RELS   5530   The Bible as Literature

3 Credit Hours.   3 Lecture Hours.   0 Lab Hours.

A study of the literary dimension of the English Bible. Major emphasis is upon the literary themes, types, personalities, and incidents of the Old and New Testaments.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in all of the following: ENGL   2111 and prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL   2131.

Cross Listing(s): RELS   5530G, COML   5530, COML   5530G, ENGL   5530, ENGL   5530G.

Chair(s): KARIN FRY

Professor(s): DAVID L. DUDLEY, OLIVIA C. EDENFIELD, RICHARD M. FLYNN, KARIN FRY, JOHN B. HUMMA (Emeritus), GAUTAM KUNDU, JOHN THOMAS LLOYD (Emeritus), FREDERICK KIRKLAND SANDERS (Emeritus), D. JASON SLONE, DOUGLASS H. THOMSON, CAREN J. TOWN, MARY A. VILLEPONTEAUX, TIMOTHY D. WHELAN

Associate Professor(s): MARIA M. ADAMOS, DUSTIN ANDERSON, ELIZABETH C. BUTTERFIELD, ROBERT COSTOMIRIS, MARC D. CYR, WILLIAM R. EATON, JULIA B. GRIFFIN, JOSEPH N. PELLEGRINO, FRED A. RICHTER (Emeritus), CANDY B. K. SCHILLE, TOMASZ WARCHOL

Assistant Professor(s): JEREMY RANDOLPH BELL, FINBARR GREGORY CURTIS, HOWARD J. KEELEY, JOHN L. PARCELS (Emeritus), DANIEL DAVID PIOSKE, MARY ALYSON PRUDE

Senior Lecturer(s): BRADLEY C. EDWARDS

Limited-Term Assistant Professor(s): ELIZABETH WATKINS